Track Descriptions

Track Co-Chairs:

Yang Bao
Shanghai Jiao Tong University
baoyang@sjtu.edu.cn

Lemai Nguyen
Deakin University
lemai.nguyen@deakin.edu.au

Harry Wang
University of Delaware
hjwang@udel.edu

Track Description:

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is continuously reshaping the landscape of business and society, ushering in transformative changes across various domains. Discriminative/predictive AI utilize algorithms, methodologies, systems, and applications to interpret and glean insights from vast and heterogeneous data to achieve specific goals, such as improving business and management operations and informing strategy development. Generative AI focuses on creating new content or solutions based on learned data and patterns and opens tremendous opportunities for innovation. However, AI also raises critical issues related to ethics, authenticity, security, and control. It is important for Information Systems (IS) researchers to study the development, implementation, and management of AI applications and understand how AI techniques create value for organizations and societies. The new and exciting research topics would significantly extend our current theories, methodologies, and empirical insights. We welcome submissions from a breadth of research paradigms, including behavioral, economics, design science, and data science.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel AI, machine learning, and deep learning methods
  • Generative AI and large language model applications
  • Responsible AI (ethics and privacy concerns in AI and AI governance)
  • AI robotics
  • Design and implementation of AI in various domains, such as metaverse, blockchain, fintech, e-commerce, healthcare, education, diversity and inclusiveness, sustainability and cybersecurity
  • Development of AI architectures, infrastructures, and capabilities
  • Machine learning fairness and algorithmic bias
  • Explainable AI
  • Social, behavioral, and economic implications of AI
  • Organizational structure and management in the age of AI
  • Success factors, best practices, and case studies in AI

Associate Editors:

  • Elbanna Amany, Royal Holloway University of London
  • Amir Andargoli, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia
  • Kristof Coussement, IÉSEG School of Management
  • Eila Erfani, University of New South Wales
  • Bing Fang, Shanghai University
  • Hui Fang, Shanghai University of Finance and Economics
  • Ian Ho, Tulane University
  • Chunxiao Li, University of Science and Technology of China
  • Tian Lu, Arizona State University
  • Jiaxu Peng, Central University of Finance and Economics, China
  • Bikesh Raj Upreti, University of Queensland
  • Gang Wang, University of Delaware
  • Wen Wang, University of Maryland
  • Haifeng Xu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Shuai Yang, Donghua University
  • Cheng Yi, Tsinghua University
  • Leting Zhang, University of Delaware Lin Qiu, Southern University of Science and Technology
  • Mingyue Zhang, Shanghai International Studies University, China

Track Co-Chairs:

Daning Hu
Southern University of Science and Technology
hdaning@gmail.com

Alvin Leung
City University of Hong Kong
acmleung@cityu.edu.hk

Track Description:

Blockchain technology has captivated the interest of both businesses and researchers ever since the advent of Bitcoin in 2009. Basic Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT) simplifies data sharing and replication, while the integration of a consensus protocol extends its functionality to the management of digital rights, encompassing cryptocurrencies and other cryptoassets. Within a blockchain network, actors ensure the integrity of transactions by participating in maintaining, updating, and validating token transactions, hence reducing the risk of double-spending.

While the original function of blockchain is facilitating cryptocurrency transfers, its applications have since transcended this initial purpose. Blockchain now offers extensive utility across various domains including a diverse spectrum of FinTech innovations, and the tokenization of inter-organizational exchanges in consortia to optimize processes within supply chains, logistics, global trade, the Internet of Things, healthcare, and energy, among others. Although the full scope of blockchain’s impact is still unfolding, we’ve already witnessed a substantial surge in the prevalence and significance of Web3 applications. These encompass groundbreaking developments like Decentralized Finance (DeFi), Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs), Decentralized Autonomous Organizations (DAOs), and the immersive realm of the Metaverse, all of which present promising avenues for business research.

In addition to DLT-related Fintech research, we welcome investigations into alternative technologies. Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) have enabled deeper insights into market dynamics and customer behavior. Established and emerging financial institutions are leveraging AI algorithms to revolutionize trading, risk management, and client interactions, with conversational agents playing a pivotal role in customer engagement. Concurrently, the banking sector faces mounting pressure to align with regulatory requirements and demonstrate commitment to sustainability.

This track seeks to highlight innovative research in the realms of Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech, while fostering discussions on their present and future trajectories. We extend an invitation for both theoretical and empirical studies adopting diverse perspectives, including behavioral, computational, design science, economics, and organizational ones.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Theories of next-generation Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech
  • Security, privacy, trust and governance of Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech
  • Protocols and algorithms for Blockchain, DLT, and Fintech
  • Blockchain, DLT, or Fintech-empowered Web 3 applications, designs and architectures
  • Decentralized Finance (DeFi) and smart contracts
  • Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs)
  • Decentralized Autonomous Organizations (DAOs)
  • Metaverse analysis and design paradigms in various business sectors
  • Blockchain-enabled incentive mechanisms in Metaverse
  • Transaction mechanisms in Web 3 platforms
  • Blockchain’s role in social innovation and impact
  • Tokenization and the transition to the token economy
  • Fintech innovations: robo-advisory, algorithmic trading, and more
  • Generative AI and its applications in Web 3 and Fintech domains

Associate Editors:

  • Leona Chandra Kruse, University of Agder
  • Yanzhen Chen, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Amanda Chu, Education University of Hong Kong
  • Raffaele Ciriello, University of Sydney
  • Ping Fan Ke, Singapore Management University
  • Xiaofan Li, National University of Singapore
  • Xiaofan Liu, City University of Hong Kong
  • Jiaqi Yan, Nanjing University
  • Xi Zhao, Xi’an Jiaotong University
  • Vincent Zhuang, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • Frank Xing, National University of Singapore

Track Co-Chairs:

Zhengrui Jiang
Nanjing University
zjiang@nju.edu.cn

Hsin-Min Lu
National Taiwan University
luim@ntu.edu.tw

Rong Zheng
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
rzheng@ust.hk

Track Description:

The advancements in business analytics (BA) and data science have become a driving force for novel algorithms, methods, systems, and applications. This track explores the intersection of BA and data science. It is important for IS researchers to study the development, implementation, and management of BA applications and understand how BA creates value for organizations and societies. The new and exciting research topics would significantly extend our current theories, methodologies, and empirical insights related to the phenomenon.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel BA, machine learning, and deep learning methods
  • Natural language processing
  • Speech recognition
  • Computer vision
  • Human-robot interaction
  • Design and implementation of BA applications, such as metaverse, blockchain, fintech, e-commerce, healthcare, and cybersecurity
  • Development of BA architectures, infrastructures, and capabilities
  • Machine learning fairness and algorithmic bias
  • Causal reasoning and causal time series forecasting in BA

Associate Editors:

  • Konstantin Bauman, Temple University
  • Yidong Chai, Hefei University of Technology
  • Kun Chen, Southern University of Science and Technology
  • Amber Yen-Chun Chou, National Chengchi University
  • Tzu-Ling Huang, National Central University
  • Andrew Lee, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Guangrui (Kayla) Li, York University
  • Pan Li, Georgia Tech
  • Siyuan Liu, Penn State University
  • Xiao Liu, Arizona State University
  • Hyunji So, McGill University
  • Kaiquan Xu, Nanjing University
  • Zhitao Yin, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
  • Nila Zhang, Fudan University

Track Co-Chairs:

Wenwen Li
Fudan University
liwwen@fudan.edu.cn

Zhepeng (Lionel) Li
University of Hong Kong
zpli@hku.hk

Track Description:

Design science is a diverse research area that extends the boundaries and capabilities of individuals and organizations by designing, building, and evaluating new constructs, models, algorithms, methods, and systems to solve practical problems. It includes computational design science, optimization design science, representation design science, and economics design science, among others (Rai, 2017). While the different streams of design science paradigms have their different focal topics and writing styles, they together make significant contributions to the world and change the practice.

In particular, we witnessed the emergence (advance) of several technologies in recent years, such as generative artificial intelligence (GenAI), Large language models (LLMs), augmented reality (AR)/metaverse, blockchain/NFT/distributed computing, cloud/edge computing, Internet of Things (IoTs), and cyber-physical system (CPS), which has afforded new possibilities as well as new concerns (e.g., interpretability, fairness, security, and privacy) for design science in various application domains. This calls for more grounded design science research that leads and directs the design, implementation, and evolution of contemporary IT artifacts, which would solve problems and improve the environment in which they are instantiated.

We thereby welcome a diversity of submissions that can produce novel theoretical knowledge, practical insights, and methodological basis on novel design science topics. The track seeks to synthesize broader understandings in the diversity of all types of design science studies.

Reference:
Arun Rai. 2017. “Editor’s Comments: Diversity of Design Science Research,” MIS Quarterly, (41: 1) pp.iii-xviii.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Design theories and principles for emerging digital technologies
  • Conceptual modeling, including big data modeling
  • Innovate design of information systems
  • Design of novel algorithms or models
  • Design for innovative applications, such as AI, AR, IoT, etc.
  • Modeling and optimization of IS design
  • IT-enabled mechanism design
  • Design for platforms and collaborative applications
  • Design science research to solve IT use and user experience issues
  • Impact of design on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Ethics in design science research
  • Fairness, security, and privacy issues in design science research
  • AI behavior and human-computer interaction design
  • Generative AI models and integration in curated IS design
  • Interpretable IS design for modern businesses
  • Other emerging methods for design science research

Associate Editors:

  • Emilia Bellucci, Deakin University
  • Gang Chen, Zhejiang University
  • Runyu Chen, University of International Business and Economics
  • Qianzhou Du, University of Science and Technology of China
  • Junming Liu, City University of Hong Kong
  • Cong Wang, Peking University
  • Dawei Wang, University of Hong Kong
  • Xuan Wei, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Da Xu, University of Mississippi
  • Dong Zhang, Sun Yat-sen University
  • Wenjun Zhou, University of Tennessee

Track Co-Chairs:

Jin Chen
University of Nottingham Ningbo China
jin.chen@nottingham.edu.cn

John Dong
Nanyang Technological University
john.dong@ntu.edu.sg

Prasanna Karhade
Chinese University of Hong Kong
pkarhade@cuhk.edu.hk

Track Description:

Digital innovation has transformed how businesses are conducted today. New technologies related to AI, big data analytics, blockchain, and the Internet of Things, are some examples that have disrupted industries and created new business models. In recent years, digital transformation by innovating business models with digital technologies is increasingly regarded as a potential solution to invigorate the market and unleash the growth potential of businesses and industries. Digital innovation will only create value for businesses if they are being properly developed and managed, and new business models are in need to capture value from innovation. Even successful digital companies such as Uber and Airbnb took years before they were able to find viable business models that leverage their innovative technologies. In saying that, these successful businesses continue to pursue digital innovation and new business models.

To fully realize the potential of digital innovation, it is crucial to discover, understand and exploit the digitally enabled opportunities to create something new, including products or services, markets, production processes, ways of organizing, and business models. This track welcomes submissions shedding new light on digital innovation and new business models. We welcome all methodological approaches and perspectives, and submissions are encouraged from all theoretical perspectives drawing from IS, strategic management, organizational/consumer behavior, and other related disciplines.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Development, evaluation, and value creation of digital innovation
  • Digital innovation management
  • Value (co-)creation and appropriation of digital innovation
  • Digital business models in the era of AI and big data
  • Strategic implications of emerging digital business models
  • Platform business models and platform economy
  • Digital transformation for digital natives or incumbents
  • Digital innovation and business models addressing societal and grand challenges

Associate Editors:

  • Mousa Ahmad Al-Bashrawi, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals
  • Zhao Cai, University of Nottingham Ningbo China
  • Jing (Elaine) Chen, Beihang University
  • Eric Kwon, Nanyang Technological University
  • Hongfei Li, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Mengxiang Li, Hong Kong Baptist University
  • Dinh Khoi Nguyen, Open University of the Netherlands
  • Xiaodie Pu, University of Nottingham Ningbo China
  • Jack Tong, Nanyang Technological University
  • Sambit Tripathi, Portland State University
  • Xiaoying Xu, South China University of Technology

Track Co-Chairs:

Yipu Deng
University of Hong Kong
yipudeng@hku.hk

Evelyn Ng
University of Sydney
evelyn.ng@sydney.edu.au

Barney Tan
University of New South Wales
barney.tan@unsw.edu.au

Track Description:

Digital platforms and ecosystems, such as Alibaba, Uber, iOS, and Facebook, have significantly transformed society over the past decade, driving the growth of online shopping, ridesharing, app development, gaming, and social networking. These technology-mediated shifts in both work and play have led to substantial IT investments in developing platform capabilities that facilitate the exchange of goods, services, or social currency across large and complex networks of suppliers, intermediaries, and customers.

These digital platforms are technology-enabled business ecosystems in themselves. Moreover, as business competition intensifies and societal changes accelerate, platforms increasingly face environmental and organizational challenges posed by their surrounding ecosystems, making it more complex to establish, manage, and sustain platform-based business models. Unlike traditional pipeline businesses, platforms must be sensitive to network effects between multiple sides of the market and manage interoperability and regulatory issues, including access, compatibility, and control of information assets.

The rapid emergence of digital platforms and ecosystems has put practitioners and researchers on notice, presenting significant challenges and opportunities for IS research. In response, this track invites submissions that enrich and advance research in the arena of digital platforms and ecosystems. We welcome rigorous and relevant studies employing a wide range of research methodologies and levels of analysis, addressing various aspects of digital platforms, ecosystems, and their impacts on business and society.

Our aim is to provide a forum for scholars to present new theories or empirical evidence in the area, fostering meaningful discussions and insights within the digital platforms and ecosystems research community.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel practices or insights on managing digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Joint innovation and entrepreneurship on digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Platform leadership and development strategies
  • Governance and regulation of digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Network effects and externalities of ecosystems
  • Emerging business models, competitive strategies, and value co-creation activities on digital platforms
  • Platform participants’ behaviors and their interactions with platforms
  • Sustainable development for digital ecosystems
  • “Dark side” of digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Privacy and security issues on digital platforms
  • Social networks in digital platforms
  • Human resource management of digital platforms
  • Economic and social implications of digital platforms and ecosystems
  • Design and implementation of digital platform architecture or infrastructure
  • The make-or-join decision for digital platforms and ecosystems
  • The antecedents, nature, and consequences of digital platform success

Associate Editors:

  • Sameer Borwankar, McGill University
  • Henry Cheung, UNSW Sydney
  • Yi Gao, Texas Tech University
  • Chunmian Ge, South China University of Technology
  • Zixiu Guo, UNSW Sydney
  • Yidi Liu, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen
  • Mylene Struijk, University of Sydney
  • Ruonan Sun, Monash University
  • Xiangyu Wang, UNSW Sydney
  • Jiayu Yao, Nanyang Technological University
  • Jie Yu, University of Nottingham, Ningbo

Track Co-Chairs:

Xi Chen
Zhejiang University
chen_xi@zju.edu.cn

Xin Xu
Hong Kong Polytechnic University
xin.xu@polyu.edu.hk

Wei Thoo Yue
City University of Hong Kong
Wei.T.Yue@cityu.edu.hk

Track Description:

The development of new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), the internet of things (IoT), social media, blockchain, and big data is rapidly changing our daily lives, business models, and society as a whole. These new technologies have given rise to specific applications such as large language models (LLMs), metaverse, virtual digital humans, and autonomous driving, injecting new energy into the development of human society. However, as our reliance on technology continues to increase, we have also seen many unintended negative consequences of technology use, causing public concerns about digital security, privacy, ethics, and resilience.

From the perspective of cybersecurity, the application of Generative AI and Discriminant AI in social media, work environments, and daily life has intensified concerns about data security. Large models are more vulnerable at the level of data security, as there are risks of data leakage due to the massive amount of data capture, automatic transmission of interactive data, and customized training. Criminals are also seeking new ways to engage in illegal online activities, such as using virtual digital humans and AI lip-syncing to conduct user-customized fraud. Therefore, governments and businesses actively seek solutions to these cybersecurity and privacy issues. We also pay attention to ethical issues in the use of technology, such as big data “discrimination,” fake news and videos generated by AI, and information bubbles created by algorithmic recommendations. The inappropriate use of technology may not only have a commercial impact but may also lead to serious legal, social, and political consequences.

As a response to these challenges, this track seeks academic contributions that attempt to provide a better understanding of (1) the potential security, privacy, and ethical issues in the use of technologies; (2) the consequences of these issues on individuals, businesses, and society; (3) possible solutions to address the concerns of security, privacy, and ethical issues while realizing the values generated by the technologies. Submitted manuscripts can draw on any theoretical background and methodological approaches.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Data security and breaches
  • User privacy and confidentiality
  • Ethical use of data and analytics
  • Internet-enabled crimes / AI-enabled crimes
  • Ethically undesirable online practices
  • Information security policy and compliance
  • Business, legal, social, and political consequences of IS security and privacy
  • The dark web, live-streaming of crimes, harmful online content, etc.
  • Discrimination issues in the context of algorithmic automated decision-making
  • Surveillance and its impact on security, privacy, and ethics in organizations
  • Fake news, online discrimination, Identification of AI-generated information.
  • Possible solutions, regulations, policies
  • Tradeoffs between analytics initiatives and security/privacy concerns
  • Security and privacy issues on emerging technologies such as AI applications, blockchain technologies, IoT, etc.
  • Security threat intelligence
  • Security/privacy concerns on crowdsourcing/crowdfunding platforms
  • Security/Privacy issues with AI self-training platforms
  • Building and designing privacy/security resilient information systems
  • Understanding how digital technologies help to create/maintain privacy and security resilience
  • Information architectures and governance framework that promote privacy /security resilience
  • Trusted computing and blockchain security

Associate Editors:

  • Honglin Deng, Tongji University
  • Ruibin Geng, Xidian University
  • Nan Hu, Singapore Management University
  • Jimmy Jin, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • Hwee-Joo Kam, University of Tampa
  • Shaobo Li, Southern University of Science and Technology
  • Albert Liu, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • Boris Ng, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • Wuyue Shangguan, Xiamen University
  • Yuan Sun, Zhejiang Gongshang University
  • Siew Fan Wong, Taylor’s University, Malaysia
  • Tianjian Zhang, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Track Co-Chairs:

Yulin Fang
University of Hong Kong
ylfang@hku.hk

Ke-Wei Huang
National University of Singapore
huangkw@comp.nus.edu.sg

Rajib Saha
Indian School of Business, India
Rajib_Saha@isb.edu

Track Description:

Technological advancements continue to reshape the design, performance, and management of work at individual, organizational, and societal levels. Traditional employment arrangements are increasingly becoming more mobile, flexible, and distributed. The rapid digitization of organizations, coupled with the effects of the pandemic, are challenging established office work routines and paving the way for contemporary work arrangements. Examples of these modern approaches to work include remote and nomadic work, the 4-day workweek, globally distributed project work, and freelancing facilitated by dedicated digital platforms.

The automation and integration of artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and blockchain in work processes are transforming organizations, industries, and potentially entire labor markets. Humans are now being replaced by, or working alongside, increasingly intelligent algorithms and robots. This has raised concerns among workers, as entire job roles and occupations face the risk of extinction, while demand for other roles in different occupations grows at an accelerating pace. Workers will need to adapt their skill sets and careers to remain employable, let alone thrive and prosper. Concurrently, the meaning of work and employment is shifting as the new generation of digital natives reshape the future of work.

We invite submissions that adopt a broad perspective on digital technologies and the future of work. We welcome submissions that explore various theoretical and methodological approaches to examining this phenomenon across different levels of analysis, such as tasks, individuals, organizations, labor markets, or society.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Automation and augmentation of work
  • New forms of technology-enabled work arrangements
  • Design theories for future work environments
  • Work culture in digital milieus
  • Mobile and nomadic work
  • Virtual work across boundaries and in the metaverse
  • People analytics and algorithmic management
  • Emerging and shifting portfolio of skills and professional development
  • Managing professional obsolescence
  • Meaning of work in digital workplaces
  • Management of work and workers in a digitized work environment
  • Emerging new careers and patterns of careers
  • Digitalisation and job mobility
  • New practices and forms of leadership in digital workplaces
  • Work in the context of the fourth industrial revolution
  • Freelancing and crowd work arrangements and practices
  • Lived experience in the digital workplace and remote working
  • Self-organized work in decentralized autonomous organizations

Associate Editors:

  • Chih-Yuan (Ben) Chou, National Chengchi University
  • Sangwook Ha, BNU-HKBU United International College
  • Junhui Jiang, South China University of Technology
  • Varun Karamshetty, National University of Singapore
  • Aditya Karanam, National University of Singapore
  • Antino Kim, Indiana University
  • Runfeng Liu, University of International Business and Economics
  • Probal Majumder, Indian Institute of Management, Udaipur
  • Sumanta Singha, Texas Tech University
  • Ayoung Suh, Sungkyunkwan University
  • Yongqiang Sun, Wuhan University
  • Ting Xu, South University of Science and Technology of China
  • Jicheng Zeng, University of Macau

Track Co-Chairs:

Sophia Duan
La Trobe University, Australia
sophia.duan@latrobe.edu.au

Emmy Phuong Hoang
RMIT University Vietnam, Vietnam
phuong.hoangai@rmit.edu.vn

Arpan Kumar Kar
Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
arpan_kar@yahoo.co.in

Track Description:

The rapid advancement of digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence and automation, robotics, cloud computing, blockchain, additive printing, and the Internet of Things has been fundamentally changing how organizations create and deliver superior value for their stakeholders, representing one of the most transformative impacts of technologies on business. Digital transformation is related to the rethinking of how to use digital technologies and other organization resources to fundamentally change the business model, processes and performances of individual and teams in the organization to gain sustainable competitive advantages. This track aims to explore the multifaceted dimensions of digital transformation and the critical role that change management plays in navigating this dynamic landscape.

This track invites thought-provoking, original research papers in any major topic of digital transformation and change management with no limitation of the research methodologies. We welcome research that either develops a new theoretical framework, offers insightful analytical viewpoints, or provides interesting empirical findings, while offering meaningful and actionable implications for practitioners.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Digital technologies as “enablers” of new business models
  • Digital strategies for digital transformation
  • Digital transformation and sustainability
  • Data-driven innovation and digital transformation
  • Organization readiness for digital transformation
  • Organization culture in digital transformation
  • Sustainable digital transformation and organization performance
  • Agile and DevOps practices in digital transformation
  • Management of digital transformation process and leadership concepts
  • New work practices, work arrangements, and changes in the nature of work
  • People-centered, and worker-centered digital transformation initiatives
  • Unintended consequences of digital transformation
  • Design science for emerging technologies to enable digital transformation

Associate Editors:

  • Umair Akram, RMIT University Vietnam, Vietnam
  • Debarun Chakraborty, Symbiosis International University, India
  • Josephine Chong, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Mai Do, RMIT University Vietnam, Vietnam
  • Mohina Gandhi, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Agam Gupta, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
  • Mohammad Iranmanesh, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Sachithra Lokuge, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
  • Van-Anh Nguyen, RMIT University Vietnam, Vietnam
  • Anushka Siriwardana, RMIT University Vietnam, Vietnam
  • Garry Tan, UCSI University, Malaysia
  • Santoso Wibowo, Central Queensland University, Australia

Track Co-Chairs:

Bingjie Deng
Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University
bingjie.deng@xjtlu.edu.cn

Dongwon Lee
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
dongwon@ust.hk

Xue Yang
Nanjing University
yangxue@nju.edu.cn

Track Description:

E-business has been one of the central phenomena in IS research. The delivery of e-business, facilitated by emerging technologies, often occurs through centralized or decentralized platforms. These platforms play a pivotal role in creating value within e-business activities, sparking investigations into design and behavioral dimensions in the realm of e-business research. The evolution of digital and mobile platforms has been significantly influenced by the rapid advancement of technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain, social media, data analytics, and the metaverse. These advancements have far-reaching effects on various facets of business transactions and activities, including search processes (e.g., voice-driven search, metaverse-enabled communications), marketing (e.g., promotion, advertisement, pricing, and reward points), payments (e.g., card-less transactions, crypto payment gateways), consumer interactions (e.g., chatbots, livestream commerce), and supply chain management (e.g., online-offline coordination, demand forecasting, inventory management), as well as order fulfillment (e.g., shipping logistics). This expansive landscape underscores the need for both empirical and theoretical research to address the managerial and commercial opportunities and challenges arising from the emergence of digital and mobile technologies and the innovation of new business models, processes, products, and services supported by the integration of these innovations.

This track invites papers that contribute to the advancement of our understanding of technical, behavioral, design, strategic, and economic aspects associated with digital and mobile platforms. Our objective is to establish a dynamic forum for the exchange of cutting-edge research ideas within these domains. We encourage the submission of manuscripts that not only capture the current state of e-business in the updated technical, social, and economic contexts but also offer innovative theoretical insights and compelling empirical evidence in IS field. We are receptive to submissions from all IS traditions and methodological approaches (e.g., analytical work, experiments, qualitative studies, design science, econometric analyses, and so on).

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Digital architecture and business analytics for e-business on digital and mobile platforms
  • Artificial intelligence and deep learning applications in digital and mobile commerce
  • E-business strategies on digital and mobile platforms
  • Business processes and management on digital and mobile platforms
  • IT-enabled digital and mobile supply chain operation and management
  • Entrepreneurship, novel business models, and new marketplaces on digital and mobile platforms
  • Recommendation, personalization, and service innovation using digital and mobile technologies
  • User studies of e-business on digital and mobile platforms
  • Mobile commerce, mobile banking, mobile marketing, and location-based services
  • Livestream commerce, voice-based commerce, and social commerce
  • Augmented reality and virtual reality applications on digital and mobile platforms
  • Omni-channel operations empowered by digital and mobile technologies
  • Trust, privacy, and security issues on digital and mobile platforms
  • Business, economic, and societal impacts

Associate Editors:

  • Jiye Baek, Korea University
  • Qiang Cao, University of International Business and Economics
  • Qi Chen, Dalian University of Technology
  • Dan Ding, Southwestern University of Finance and Economics
  • Feiyu E, University of Maryland
  • Yuanyue Feng, Shenzhen University
  • Rui Gu, University of International Business and Economics
  • Sumeet Gupta, Indian Institute of Management Raipur
  • Wei Hu, Tongji University
  • Yuxin Huang, Soochow University
  • Yun Young Hur, George Mason University
  • Yifan Jiao, University of Macau
  • Hyungsoo Lim, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)
  • Ying Liu, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Sunghyuk Park, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
  • Jaeung Sim, University of Connecticut
  • Xueyan Ying, City University of Hong Kong
  • Chenxu Zheng, National University of Singapore
  • Sijia Zhou, Southeast University

Track Co-Chairs:

Xitong Guo
Harbin Institute of Technology
xitongguo@hit.edu.cn

Na Liu
University of Sydney Business School
liu.na@sydney.edu.au

Vaibhav Rajan
National University of Singapore
vaibhav@comp.nus.edu.sg

Track Description:

Digital health is an area of robust growth. Health technology keeps on progressing at a noteworthy rate and plays a critical role in the healthcare delivery system, including enhancing the quality of care, transparency of medical information, and efficiency of information flow. The promise of digital health solutions, such as those based on AI and machine learning, is to deliver more cost-efficient and patient-centric healthcare through widespread sharing of authorized data, process transformation, and proactive involvement by patients to sustain their well-being.

While technological advancements bring great benefits to healthcare, they also pose many challenges including issues related to (1) massive healthcare data integration, (2) security, privacy, and the socio-technical aspects of patient safety, (3) explanations of the findings based on big data analysis, (4) implementation of healthcare innovations and (5) ensuring the health IS solutions are accessible and beneficial to all individuals, regardless of their socioeconomic status, geographic location, age, gender, ethnicity or other factors.

The core aim of this track is to provide an opportunity for the participants, including scholars, policy decision-makers, industry partners, stakeholders, and the general public, to meet, interact and exchange new ideas, and share innovations on health IT and IS for healthcare in the digital age and bring together ideas to address more challenging problems. We welcome all research related to health IT and IS for healthcare and are open to all types of research methods (e.g., simulation, survey, experimentation, literature review, case studies, action research, etc.). Practice-based research is also appreciated. Both full research papers and research-in-progress papers are welcome.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Health informatics and biomedical informatics
  • Big data, applied AI, and machine learning in healthcare
  • User-generated content and its impact on healthcare practices and providers
  • Online citizen science in healthcare
  • Personalized and precision medicine
  • E-health, telehealth, mobile health, and their impacts
  • Wearable health devices and their health outcomes
  • Patient accessibility and health care simulation
  • Electronic data sharing and transfer using health information exchanges
  • Safety, security, and privacy of health information
  • Technology-enabled patient care (self-care) management
  • The impact of Healthcare Information Systems on care providers, patients, and payers
  • Digital health inclusion
  • Digital therapeutics
  • Generative AI and healthcare

Associate Editors:

  • Michael Cahalane, University of New South Wales Business School
  • Liwei Chen, University of Cincinnati
  • Shuqing Chen, Harbin Institute of Technology
  • Aaron Cheng, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Rebekah Eden, University of Queensland Business School
  • Pari Delir Haghighi, Monash University
  • Joyce Lee, National Chengchi University
  • Yu-Kai Lin, Georgia State University
  • Julian Presters, University of Sydney Business School
  • Kathy Ning Shen, UAE University
  • Yicheng Song, University of Minnesota
  • Nelly Todorova, University of Canterbury
  • Weiguang Wang, University of Rochester
  • Nilmini Wickramasinghe, La Trobe University
  • Yi Wu, Tianjin University
  • Jiaheng Xie, University of Delaware
  • Ran (Alan) Zhang, Texas Tech University
  • Xiaofei Zhang, Nankai University
  • Ya Zhou, Xiamen University

Track Co-Chairs:

Sabine Matook
University of Queensland
s.matook@business.uq.edu

Juliana Sutanto
Monash University
juliana.sutanto@monash.edu

Yu Tong
Zhejiang University
tong_yu@zju.edu.cn

Track Description:

The design and development of information systems (IS) has accelerated in speed and complexity in the recent years. The advancements of artificial intelligence have further contributed to this acceleration. As a result, a vast array of person and business applications is awaiting to be used. This does not come without challenges, including knowledge and expertise gaps of designers and users. The 2024 PACIS aims to respond to this trend with the theme of “Preparing the next generation for the IT-Driven Future”. Consequently, research on human-centric IS design, development, and use needs to ensure that the human is at the center while thinking ahead on how to equip young minds with the skills, insights, and mindset to drive design, development, and use of digital artifacts.

This track invites research that enhances our knowledge of human-centric activities and interactions with humans as designers, developers, and users at the individual, group, organization, and societal levels as well as the intersection across levels. We welcome papers that employ a variety of theories, perspectives, and methodologies (e.g., qualitative, quantitative, conceptual, and design science, conducted in the field or the lab).
Research that adopts an interdisciplinary approach examines less-explored areas, and focuses on emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, autonomous systems, no-code/low code generative technologies is especially encouraged.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Novel philosophical/theoretical/methodological perspectives that broaden and deepen the concept of human-centricity in IS design, development, and use.
  • Design, development and use of low-code and no-code digital technologies.
  • Ethical considerations that arise with the design, development, and use of information systems with surveillance capabilities.
  • Contextualized factors influencing IT/IS use at micro and macro levels.
  • Interdependencies between individual, group, organizational, or societal IT/IS use decisions and multilevel perspectives on use.
  • Feature- or affordance-oriented IT/IS design and development – challenges and opportunities.
  • Global or cross-cultural studies of IT/IS design, development, and use of information systems.
  • Design, development, and use of IS to tackle social and ecological problems, such as systemic discrimination, social justice, societal and human crises, and climate change.
  • Understanding IT implementation through an expanded conception of value beyond performance (e.g., well-being, environmental health, societal stability).
  • Identifying diffusion patterns in use of emerging technologies.
  • Theorization of users’ resistance to emerging digital technologies in various contexts (e.g., healthcare, education, etc.) and strategies to address the resistance.

Associate Editors:

  • Ben Choi, Nanyang Technological University
  • Caddie Gao, Monash University
  • Qiqi Jiang, Copenhagen Business School
  • Zheng Lu, University of Nottingham Ningbo China
  • Xixian Peng, Zhejiang University
  • Yide Shen, Rowan University
  • Jeannette Stark, TU Dresden
  • Silviana Tana, Australian National University
  • Jiamin Yin, Renmin University of China

Track Co-Chairs:

Duong Dang
University of Vaasa
duong.dang@uwasa.fi

Yang Liu
Xi’an Jiaotong University
liuyang.alison@xjtu.edu.cn

May Wang
BNU-HKBU
ywang@uic.edu.cn

Track Description:

This track delves into the evolving nature of human interaction with technologies (e.g., web interface, mobile interaction, VR/AR/MR, AI, algorithmic interfaces, chatbots, or robots), in organizational, managerial, cultural, and social contexts. With the increasing integration of emerging technologies, we are experiencing new forms of collaboration between humans, machines, and AI, leading to transformative impacts on individual experiences and work dynamics. Hence, understanding how digital technology shapes human cognition and emotion, and how users interact with AI is important for advancing this field of research. Additionally, there is a keen interest in exploring the implementation processes and methodologies that facilitate value creation in the realm of Human-Computer/AI Interaction.

Our interest particularly lies in examining the influence of digital technology on human cognition and emotion, and its subsequent effects on individual performance, organizational dynamics, and broader societal challenges (such as AI fairness, information cocoon and deepfake). Papers that investigate the design, usage and impacts of Human-Computer/AI Interaction and its synergistic interactions with other technologies, such as machine learning and data analytics, are highly encouraged as well.

We are open to a broad range of methodological approaches, encompassing both theoretical and empirical studies. This includes, but is not limited to, experiments, analytical research, qualitative investigations, design science, and econometric analysis.  Join us in advancing our understanding of the multifaceted aspects of human-computer and human-AI interactions in the context of individual, organizational, managerial, cultural, and social dynamics.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Aesthetic and affective computing
  • Algorithm management for digital platforms
  • Cognitive biases and heuristics in the context of novel technologies and digital nudging
  • Cognitive overload and technostress
  • Design and evaluation of end-user computing in work and non-work environments, and in developing versus developed economies
  • Embedded IT applications, including AI systems, intelligent homes, and spatial systems
  • Feature-level IT adoption and use
  • HCI and interface design issues with new devices and applications (e.g., smartphones, social networking sites, M-commerce, pervasive computing, VR/AR/MR)
  • Human information-seeking behavior on digital platforms
  • Human interactions with autonomous and intelligent AI systems (e.g., chatbots, robots, autonomous vehicles)
  • Human-centeredness and user-centeredness in system design, development, and use
  • Impact of interfaces on attitudes, behavior, performance, perception, learning, and productivity
  • Interfaces for information visualization, analytics, and human-data interaction
  • NeuroIS studies on information systems design and use, including neurocognition, neurophysiology, and eye tracking
  • Novel Human-Computer/AI interaction theories, techniques, and methodologies
  • Personalization and adaptive interfaces
  • Psychological, social, and cultural aspects of human-computer and AI interactions
  • Studies on online persuasion and deception in AI-driven environments, including fake news, fake reviews, and manipulative e-commerce strategies
  • Studies and frameworks examining trust, satisfaction, and expectations of AI systems
  • Usability engineering, metrics, and methods for user interface assessment
  • Usability and design research for human-AI collaboration
  • AI Governance and Ethics in human-AI interactions
  • User attitudes, behavior, and decision-making processes related to AI-generated content
  • Ethical considerations and potential biases associated with AI-generated content

Associate Editors:

  • Quang Bui, Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Fang-Kai Chang, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan
  • Laurence Chang, Feng Chia University
  • Mengyao Fu, City University of Hong Kong
  • Andreas Janson, University of St. Gallen
  • Jonna Järveläinen, University of Turku
  • Zhiyin Li, City University of Hong Kong
  • Cheng Luo, Tianjin University
  • Roxana Ologeanu-Taddei, TBS Education, France
  • Yani Shi, Southeast University
  • Tero Vartiainen, University of Vaasa
  • Pauline Weritz, The University of Twente, Netherlands
  • Bingqing Xiong, Deakin University
  • Sangseok You, Sungkyunkwan University
  • Jingzhi Zhang, BNU-HKBU
  • Runge Zhu, Central University of Finance and Economics

Track Co-Chairs:

Lesley Gardner
University of Auckland
l.gardner@auckland.ac.nz

Philip Tin Yun Lee
Hong Kong Shue Yan University
tylee@hksyu.edu

Hsiang Hui Lek
National University of Singapore
lekhsian@comp.nus.edu.sg

Track Description:

As each year passes, the role of the IS educator becomes more exciting, albeit challenging. This year marks a significant turning point with the recognition of the pervasive use of generative AI by university college students and staff. With the introduction of ChatGPT and other similar technologies, there has been a greater awareness of AI and its usefulness in all aspects of life. Like many other sectors, education has been forced to pivot its learning and teaching methods to accommodate such a disruption, and as such, it has brought about both opportunities and challenges for educators and learners. For example, while ChatGPT-based systems can facilitate self-learning, there is a risk of over-reliance on such systems which hinders learning where learners lose the ability to problem-solve on their own. Furthermore, although the pandemic has come to an end, the transition from online/hybrid teaching back to classroom teaching does not guarantee the restoration of the learning behaviour that existed before COVID-19. Thus, various aspects, including curriculum, pedagogy, and pedagogical innovations, should be reviewed to adapt to the current landscape.

The primary objective of this track is to furnish researchers with a scholarly platform conducive to the discourse of Information Systems (IS) education, pedagogy, and digital learning. This endeavour seeks to afford researchers an avenue for the articulation of conceptual frameworks pertaining to the integration of Generative AI technology within educational paradigms alongside the exploration of other innovative pedagogical concepts. Beyond the sharing of instructional pedagogies, methodologies, and tools, researchers are encouraged to contribute empirical insights garnered from their investigations into various dimensions of teaching and learning. It is anticipated that this scholarly exchange will foster a nuanced understanding of the transformative potential of AI in education and pave the way for the continued refinement and evolution of pedagogical practices

This track aims to provide researchers with a platform and opportunity to discuss IS education, pedagogy, and digital learning. We invite researchers to share their empirical findings, research, experience and approaches in a number of areas focusing on the innovation and adoption of technology driven learning scenarios ranging from emerging technologies through to more widely accepted methods and pedagogical approaches.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • IS curriculum design, innovation, and model curricula
  • Innovative pedagogical approaches and evaluation in IS education
  • Digital Innovation in education, assessment and learning
  • AI and Generative AI, and its impacts
  • Generative AI assessment strategies
  • Post COVID-19 learning behaviour
  • E-learning innovation
  • Dark sides of IT in IS education and digital learning
  • Educational big data and learning analytics
  • Autodidactism or self-learning in IS education
  • Workplace and lifelong education for IS discipline
  • IT-enabled blended learning(e.g., Mobile technology, VR/AR, AI, blockchain, etc.) innovative learning environments (e.g., MOOC, blended learning, micro-learning, fragmented courses, smart and personalized education, collaborative Learning, etc.).

Associate Editors:

  • Greg Anderson, Brigham Young University
  • Cheuk Hang Au, National Chung Cheng University
  • Wei Cui, National University of Singapore
  • Kung Wong Lau, Hong Kong Shue Yan University
  • Yang Lei, Southern University of Science and Technology
  • Yang Lu, National University of Singapore
  • Annette Mills, University of Canterbury
  • Udayangi Muthupoltotage, University of Auckland
  • Saima Qutab, University of Auckland
  • Dimple R. Thadani, Hong Kong Baptist University
  • Eugene Yin Cheung Wong, Hang Seng University of Hong Kong

Track Co-Chairs:

Abhishek Kathuria
Indian School of Business
abhishek_kathuria@isb.edu

Ilan Oshri
University of Auckland Business School
Ilan.oshri@auckland.ac.nz

Adrian Yeow
Singapore University of Social Sciences
adrianyeowyk@suss.edu.sg

Track Description:

With the diffusion of enterprise mobile applications, artificial intelligence (AI), and other digital technologies, organizations are experimenting with and implementing various digital products and services to improve customer experiences, supplier integration, and internal operational efficiency. To maintain competitiveness in such a dynamic environment, organizations must mindfully and agilely orchestrate digital technologies with other organizational assets and capabilities to create – or modify existing – business strategies, processes, and structures. As such, significant challenges pertaining to governance and IS value are salient and require ongoing discussions and research.

For example, how do organizations and management appraise the business value of digital innovations such as LLM and other AI-enabled processes? How do organizations manage the governance of such digital and AI-enabled capabilities in terms of organizational designs or managerial approaches? What are the implications of such designs and approaches on organizational and inter-organizational collaboration trajectories? At the same time, how does the use of such digital technologies and the digital transformation that follows enable new organizational structures, business operations, and ways of building inter-organizational collaborations such as joint ventures and sourcing engagements? Together, these questions show that we need further assessment of the impact of digital technologies and transformation processes within the strategic management context.

This track invites thought-provoking, original research papers. We welcome research that develops a new theoretical framework, offers insightful analytical viewpoints, or provides interesting empirical findings. We also require that submitted papers offer meaningful and actionable implications for practitioners.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • A digital solution for business value (co-)creation and capture
  • Digital creativity and innovations
  • Digital capability creation and management
  • Benefit realization of digitalization innovation/transformation
  • IS/IT flexibility, alignment, and ambidexterity
  • Digital platform governance
  • Governance of enterprise or inter-organizational IS/IT applications and services
  • New business models enabled by digital innovations
  • The management and governance of digital sourcing

Associate Editors:

  • Mariana Andrade, University of Georgia
  • Calvin Chan, Singapore University of Social Sciences
  • Daniel Gozman, Sydney University
  • Shailaja Jha, S.P. Jain Institute of Management & Research
  • Wang Le, City University of HK
  • Shi Ying Lim, National University of Singapore
  • Gloria Liu, Massey University
  • Yunfei Shi, University of New South Wales
  • Xinwei Wang, University of Auckland
  • Randy Wong, University of Auckland
  • Derek Wu, Beihang University

Track Co-Chairs:

Yuanyuan Chen
University of Alabama
ychen200@ua.edu

Keongtae Kim
Chinese University of Hong Kong
keongkim@cuhk.edu.hk

Lusi Yang
Georgia State University
lusiyang@gsu.edu

Track Description:

An emerging body of research has been conducted on the sharing economy and crowd-based platforms in the field of information systems. The implications of these topics are profound for our economy and society. This track invites cutting-edge research that addresses the issues and challenges associated with these topics.

Sharing economy has disrupted conventional practices by redefining ownership, utilization, and access to resources. This sharing can involve goods (such as houses, cars, or tools) or services (like transportation, accommodation, or freelance work), as exemplified on Airbnb, Grab, Lyft, Bird and Zipcar. It cultivates resource optimization, reshapes how individuals interact with and utilize goods and services, consequently transforming the economic landscape.

Likewise, the sharing economy would not have been possible without digital platforms that harness the power of “crowd” to connect distributed and heterogeneous individuals. Broadly, crowd-based platforms have been widely leveraged for process innovation, product development, knowledge exchange, content creation, etc. These different forms of crowd-based platforms cater to diverse needs, from facilitating idea generation to funding projects.

In this track, we welcome papers that explore questions related to the above topics from diverse perspectives, which include but are not limited to different levels of analysis, theoretical positionings, and methodological approaches. This track is open to all types of research, conceptual, theoretical, analytical and/or empirical.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Open innovation in crowd-based platforms
  • Trust and reputations in the sharing economy and crowd-based platforms
  • AI-powered tools to optimize resource allocation
  • Individual and group incentives in the innovation process on crowd-based platforms
  • Ethical considerations of AI in the sharing economy
  • Individual behaviors in crowd market
  • Case studies on sharing economy and crowd-based platforms
  • Social, economic and legal implications of sharing economy and crowd-based models
  • Novel theories and perspectives about sharing economy and crowd-based business models
  • Crowdsourcing and crowdfunding
  • Digital entrepreneurship in crowd-based models
  • Diversity, ethics, and inclusivity in sharing economy
  • Critical reviews related to sharing economy and crowd-based platforms

Associate Editors:

  • Jingbo Hou, Santa Clara University
  • Qianran (Jenny) Jin, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Nakyung Kyung, National University of Singapore
  • Gunwoong Lee, Korea University
  • Huifang Li, University of Science and Technology of China
  • Yongjin Park, City University of Hong Kong
  • Maria Pouri, University of Zurich
  • Chuan (Annie) Tian, University of Alabama
  • Shagun Tripathi, IE University, Spain
  • Xunyi Wang, Baylor University
  • Sungjin Yoo, Soongsil University

Track Co-Chairs:

Zhuolan Bao
Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen
baozhuolan@cuhk.edu.cn

Warut Khern-am-nuai
McGill University
Warut.khern-am-nuai@mcgill.ca

Zhijie Lin
Tsinghua University
linzhj@sem.tsinghua.edu.cn

Track Description:

Social media and digital collaboration are core pillars of research inquiry into how digital technologies connect people and enable social and collaborative interactions. The Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS) has a tradition of promoting scholarship that advances knowledge in this domain and invites submission of cutting-edge research on related topics.

Social media continues to be a prominent feature of individual, organizational and societal life. Its broad reach extends from facilitating personal interactions to shaping the global flows of information among organizations and nations. Impacting individuals, social media is often a primary source of news, a platform for establishing and maintaining social networks, and a basis for building personal brand and reputation. Impacting organizations, it serves as a means to engage with customers, a channel for shaping brand image, a valuable source of information for business decisions, and an avenue for influence on a global scale. Impacting society, social media serves as a tool for coordinating social movements, understanding needs and preferences, providing services, and promoting social and political values. Social media has also had unintended consequences including the growing skepticism about traditionally accepted information sources, amplification of hate speech and other forms of cyberbullying, cybercrime, harvesting of personal data, and the emergence of filter bubbles.

Digital collaboration is now a mainstream approach to accomplish a wide variety of objectives in business and society. With recent pandemic events, digital collaboration has become even more prominent. From dyads and small groups to large-scale collectives and organizations, digital tools, such as platforms, are major means for facilitating collaboration. Digital collaboration takes many forms in a wide range of domains including open innovation, crowd work, distributed and hybrid teams, knowledge sharing communities, human-machine collaboration, and work-from-home (WFH) schemes. Evolving technologies, such as intelligent assistance systems, digital platforms, or AI agents as collaborators, facilitate greater participation in the exchange and integration of knowledge and resources. However, they also raise questions about fairness, effectiveness, ownership of intellectual property, overload, and suboptimal collaboration dynamics.

We invite submissions that explore new areas, advance new insights, develop new methods, or challenge established points of view on social media phenomena and/or digital collaboration. The track is open to empirical, methodological, and conceptual research employing diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives and paradigms.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Understanding the value and impact of information content on social media
  • Exploring multidimensional effects of social media
  • Collaboration spanning online and offline interactions
  • Interactions (or lack of), competition or collaboration between social media groups
  • Intra-and-inter-enterprise use of social media or digital collaborations
  • Promoting resilience and integration of work-from-home into organizations
  • Influence of social media and digital collaborations on changing nature of work
  • Digital collaboration practices within and across organizations
  • Digital collaboration practices between organizations, society and individuals
  • Leveraging social media/digital collaboration for agility
  • Management of social media or digital collaboration
  • Novel theories about social media or digital collaboration and its effects on individuals, organizations, and/or societies
  • Novel designs of social media or digital collaboration to encourage information diffusion, knowledge sharing, and/or better collaboration dynamics
  • Novel algorithms for the facilitation of social media interactions or digital collaboration
  • Novel qualitative or quantitative methods of assessing social media or digital collaboration
  • New method development (e.g., econometric or data-science methods) to study and better harness the business potential of social media or digital collaboration
  • Prediction and nowcasting using social media data
  • Reputation and trust in social media or digital collaboration
  • Impact of social media on information exposure and consumption
  • Negative aspects of social media or digital collaboration, and their mitigation strategies, methods or designs
  • Use of social media or digital collaboration to combat environmental crises
  • Use of social media or digital collaboration for political participation and societal challenges
  • Novel user interfaces and user interaction modes for digital collaboration (e.g., immersive technologies)
  • AI enhanced collaboration processes
  • The collaboration of AI-based systems with social media users (e.g., identifying fake news with ML, delivering facts in echo chambers with conversational agents or social bots)

Associate Editors:

  • Jianxiong Huang, South China University of Technology
  • Kyunghee Lee, McGill University
  • Ding Li, Nanjing University
  • Honglei Li, Northumbria University
  • Qi Li, Zhejiang GongShang University
  • Qinfang Luo, Tsinghua University
  • Divinus Oppong-Tawiah, York University
  • Seyoung Seol, University of Warwick
  • Qi Wang, City University of Hong Kong
  • Hongzhe Zhang, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen
  • Kai Zhu, Bocconi University

Track Co-Chairs:

Julia Kotlarsky
University of Auckland
jkot131@uoa.auckland.ac.nz

Rohit Nishant
Universite Laval
Rohit.nishant@fsa.ulaval.ca

Van-Hau Trieu
Deakin University
t.trieu@deakin.edu.au

Track Description:

Sustainability is a moral and existential imperative of our time. In response to the various societal, economic, and environmental challenges, the United Nations 2030 Agenda has outlined Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). These goals prioritise addressing poverty, diminishing inequality, fostering economic growth, innovation, and tackling urgent global issues such as climate change, the preservation of natural resources, particularly oceans and forests, and preventing biodiversity loss. As we urgently seek solutions for these challenges, digital technologies stand out as vital tools in transforming our society positively and helping to contribute to the world’s sustainable development, better health and education. Indeed, recent years have seen growing efforts by organizations, governments and industries worldwide to harness digital technologies for addressing sustainability challenges. Examples of such efforts range from specific solutions, such as IoT sensors that are widely used by many organizations to pursue sustainability objectives, to the birth of new data-driven companies that apply advanced analytics and Artificial Intelligence (AI) to offer sustainability-related data services. However, with the rapid and ubiquitous development and deployment of advanced digital technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), digital twins, and the Internet of things (IoT) their use has started impacting the diverse facets of business, society, and individuals in both positive and negative ways. For instance, increasing reliance on digital technologies by organizations, combined with national policies that set sustainability targets, aims to reduce society’s carbon footprint. Yet, digital technologies by themself are carbon-intensive, and their unbridled use can adversely impact the environment. In a similar vein, as many organizations nowadays are relying on digital technologies to run their business, there are individuals, groups and/or communities that are left behind, excluded or disadvantaged, if they are not able to adjust to new digital ways that organizations operate.

Overall, along with playing a major role in contributing towards achieving sustainability goals and a better society, digital technologies are generating unintended consequences, which we are only starting to understand.

Consequently, this track aims to develop both theoretical understanding and practical insights into topics that are at the core of sustainability (e.g., SDGs) as well as the social and ethical implications of digital technologies. We invite empirical and conceptual research papers that deal with the sustainability and societal impact of digital technologies. We welcome insights into the potential benefits of digital technologies while also examining the unforeseen consequences resulting from their use.  Any methodological approaches are welcome.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Harnessing digital technologies to attain SDGs (i.e. we recommend focusing on a particular SDG).
  • Embracing digital sustainability for dealing with environmental and societal challenges.
  • Understanding the impact of digital inclusion/exclusion on individuals, communities, and society at large.
  • Unintended consequences of digital technologies (e.g., discrimination, digital divide, technostress, surveillance, unethical uses of digital technologies) that result from implementing digital technologies for sustainability and/or societal impact.
  • Development and/or sourcing of digital technologies for sustainability (e.g., digital sustainability solutions and services).
  • Implementation, adoption and/or governance of digital sustainability initiatives in organisational and national contexts.
  • Different forms of digital exclusion and mechanisms to address them.

Associate Editors:

  • Suchit Ahuja, Concordia University
  • Antonio Díaz Andrade, University of Agder
  • Jade Wendy Brooks, University of Auckland
  • Saurav Chakraborty, University of Louisville
  • Alex Chung, Universite Laval
  • Wilson Li, Deakin University
  • Xue Ning, University of Wisconsin-Parkside
  • Mairead O’Connor, UNSW
  • Gabrielle Peko, University of Auckland
  • Sandeep Mysore Seshadrinath, UNSW
  • Franz Strich, Deakin University
  • Angsana Techatassanasoontorn, Auckland University of Technology
  • Suchit Ahuja, Concordia University

Track Co-Chairs:

Daegon Cho
Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
daegon.cho@kaist.ac.kr

Jian Mou
Pusan National University, South Korea
jian.mou@pusan.ac.kr

Qian Tang
Singapore Management University
qiantang@smu.edu.sg

Track Description:

The pervasive integration of technology into our social and professional spheres has highlighted the critical interplay between user behavior and information systems. On one hand, user behaviors are shaped and influenced by advanced technologies and innovative applications in digital platforms and services. One the other hand, the design and iterative improvement of information systems and IT artifacts have taken user-centered design principles featuring adaptive user interfaces that are responsive to evolving user experiences and feedback. This interplay gives rise to many important and intriguing research questions related to the design of incentive schemes such as reward systems and personalized experiences to enhance user engagement in digital platforms and services, the efficacy of digital interventions such as digital nudges and gamification strategies in steering user actions, the consequences of user behavior on individual and organizational outcomes, and the implications of changing user behaviors for broader social phenomena such as digital addition, digital divide, and polarization. To answer these questions, we need to delve deeper into understanding users, including their tasks, motivations, decision-making processes, and social interactions, within different contexts.

This track invites research that offers new theoretical, methodological, and practical insights into the interplay between technology and user behavior. We seek investigations into user engagement, its influencing factors, intervention mechanisms, resulting effects, and consequences. These investigations can be conducted at the individual, group, team, organizational, societal level, or across different levels. Research that examines less-explored areas or the latest technological advances is especially encouraged. We welcome all types of research such as conceptual, theoretical, and/or empirical.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Technological influence on user behaviors
  • User engagement at digital platforms and services (e.g., user-centered design principles, adaptive user interface or experiences
  • The role of user feedback in the design and iterative improvement of IT artifacts
  • The consequence of user behaviors (e.g., digital addiction or digital divide, and so on)
  • Human interactions with technologies
  • Consequences of IS use, user behaviors, and user engagement
  • Role of engagement in the consumerization of information technologies
  • User engagement techniques/incentives/strategies in online environment
  • Gamification and its influence on user behaviors
  • Creation of engaging information system designs
  • Impact of digital engagement on individual welfare
  • Dark side of technology and digital engagement on user behaviors and outcomes
  • Post-adoptive usage behaviors and their consequences
  • Incentives encouraging use behaviors
  • Analysis of user behavior and its impact on the design of IT artifact
  • Cyberspace governance and its impact on user behavior
  • Knowledge-sharing communities
  • Career management platforms
  • Social, location and mobile platforms
  • Senior population and IT usage
  • Other individual behaviors such as health informatics, online education, live-streaming and online game

Associate Editors:

  • Xusen Cheng, Renmin University of China
  • Hanbyeol Chol, Myungji University
  • Xiling Cui, Hong Kong Shue Yan Unviersity
  • Yuanyuan Dang, South China University of Technology
  • Chong Guan, Singapore University of Social Sciences
  • Martin Kang, Loyola Marymount University
  • Jongki Kim, Pusan National University
  • Jin Li, Xi’an Jiaotong University
  • Dan Ma, Singapore Management University, Singapore
  • Mingsong Mao, Jiangxi University of Finance and Economics
  • Jaehong Park, Kyunghee University
  • Dandan Qiao, National University of Singapore
  • Sunghan Ryu, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Xiao-Liang Shen, Wuhan University
  • Yingnan Shi, Australian National University
  • Edin Smailhodzic, University of Groningen
  • Tingting Song, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  • Hsiao-Ting Tseng, National Central University, Taiwan
  • Nannan Xi, Tampere University
  • Lin Xiao, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Shan Xiao, Gonzaga University
  • Zhou Zhou, The City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Track Co-Chairs:

Kaushik Dutta
University of South Florida
duttak@usf.edu

Hee-Woong Kim
Yonsei University
kimhw@yonsei.ac.kr

Xianghua Lu
Fudan University
lxhua@fudan.edu.cn

Track Description:

This track includes General IS topics and Emerging topics. The General IS Topics is intended for high-quality papers on topics that do not have a specific fit with other tracks or have a very comprehensive, cross-thematic scope. The track aims to attract unique and novel papers and give an additional degree of freedom to the conference’s specific tracks, from an epistemological, ontological as well as methodological standpoint. The General IS Topics track furthermore provides the chairs of other tracks the opportunity to submit their manuscripts.

The track also includes topics in emerging areas in which an explicit separate track is not available. Emerging information technologies have ushered in an era of digitalization, accelerating the proliferation of digital innovations at all levels (i.e., individuals, organizations, and societies) and extending the frontier of research for the IS discipline.
To prepare for an increasingly digitalized future, the track welcomes all pioneering research that pushes the boundaries of IS research and practices. In situations where a separate track exists for emerging topics (such as AI, Blockchain, etc.), authors submit their papers in that track only.

We encourage submissions to the track to (1) contest existing paradigms in the field of IS that may no longer be applicable in light of recent technological trends, (2) advance novel methodologies for generating fresh insights into trends that would not have been possible otherwise, (3) open up new avenues for research that addresses elusive issues to be resolved in anticipation of a digitalized future and (4) break the common notion of ubiquitous digitization is always beneficial of social good.The track embraces research that is deliberately provocative and touches on the broader individual, managerial, and/or societal issues arising from the way technologies are likely to progress in the future. Issues of rampant digitization on the environment and society will be a topic suitable in this track.

Any type of submission, including agenda-setting reviews, empirical studies, opinion pieces, system/application design, and/or theory development papers, is welcome. Given that emerging technological trends tend to permeate disciplinary and methodological boundaries, we encourage interdisciplinary and/or methodologically pluralistic work that offers a novel view of emerging IS phenomena.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):

  • Contemporary challenges and/or opportunities associated with developmental trends in
  • Brain-computer interaction
  • Impact of digitalization on environment
  • Impact of digitalization on society
  • Digital twin
  • Edge computing
  • Green computing
  • Holographic 3D printing
  • Immersive media (e.g., augmented reality, virtual reality, mixed reality, extended reality)
  • Jitterbug, assistive technology, and gerontechnology
  • Kill chain management
  • Low code technology and development platforms
  • Metaverse and non-fungible tokens (NFTs)
  • Neuro-IS
  • Open-source intelligence
  • Pervasive computing
  • Quantum computing applications
  • Robotic process automation with human-in-the-loop
  • Smart devices, homes, offices, cities, and nations
  • Total or multi-experience
  • Universal authentication
  • Voice and speech recognition for conversational chatbots
  • Wearable and haptic technology
  • Operational challenges for analytics and machine learning

Associate Editors:

  • Youngsok Bang, Yonsei University
  • Zike Cao, Zhejiang University, China
  • Soumyakanti Chakraborty, Indian Institute of Management Calcutta
  • Yue (Katherine) Feng, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
  • Sodam Kim, Shenzhen MSU-BIT University
  • Taekyung Kim, Kyung Hee University
  • Yongsuk Kim, Sungkyunkwan University
  • So-Hyun Lee, Kyonggi University
  • Nargis Pervin, Indian Institute of Technology Madras
  • Shankar Prawesh, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
  • Vivek Singh, University of Missouri St. Louis
  • Jing Tian, Pennsylvania State University
  • Xiaolun Wang, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China
  • Shen Yi, Soochow University
  • Yicheng Zhang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China
  • Yingjie Zhang, Peking University